Thursday, January 10, 2019

Along the Rim


For several months a camera trap had been along the rim of the Allegheny Plateau. Some of the photographs from that camera trap were in this post. After retrieving those photos and seeing how much wildlife activity there had been on the trail along the rim, I decided to replace that camera trap with one that took videos. The yield from the video camera’s first several weeks justified switching the cameras –
The bear has had an encounter with humans as indicated by the tags in his ears. Perhaps he was a nuisance somewhere and found himself in a trap and relocated.

Unfortunately the southern flying squirrel didn’t stay in the camera’s view very long maybe next time.

The oaks on the plateau had some acorns this year, but far from a bumper crop. Going into winter those concentrated packets of energy are some of the most important foods for mammals and birds; the bear, deer, squirrels and raccoon were almost certainly seeking whatever acorns they could find.

Gray squirrels are at or near the peak of one of their population cycles, perhaps brought on by an excellent acorn crop in 2017. Now, squirrels will have a difficult time finding enough food to carry them through the winter and the population will probably collapse.


12 comments:

Marcia said...

Fascinating to watch. Did the camera make noise? The deer seemed to prick their ears a d turn to the camera like they heard it.

The Furry Gnome said...

Really enjoyed that video,such a great look into the wildlife. I could just picture the same thing here (well, maybe not the bear).

KB said...

Thanks for sharing

Lady Fi said...

Wow - amazing to see so much wildlife.

Trevor Willis said...

Great stuff as usual Woody

Camera Trap Codger said...

After years of camera trapping I still get a thrill when I see the critters moving through. There's something rsassuring about it (even when the game commission can't decide what their charge really is).

David Gascoigne said...

It is really quite amazing how these devices have enabled us to view wildlife in their natural state without having to construct elaborate hides and undertake countless (and often fruitless) lengthy vigils.

Anu said...

Hello. Great place for the videocamera, because there are so many different animals. Wonderful video!

Jenn Jilks said...

What an amazing video! I love them all.

I have the same critters, as well. I don't do videos too much. It eat up memory and batteries. Sometimes, though!

(ツ) from Cottage Country Ontario , ON, Canada!

fgdgfd said...

As a camera trapping newbie I love your pictures! May I ask what equipment you are using? I don't think my $100 cameras can produce that quality. Also, some of your pictures look like you are using additional flash. Is that correct?

Woody Meristem said...

"May I ask what equipment you are using?"
This video is from a Browning Strike Force Elite which is no longer made. Browning's Special Ops and Recon Force cameras, even some of the older versions, produce better videos -- "Fall at the Fallen Log" and "Bathing at the Bear Wallow" are both from Special Ops. "Bears Being Bears" is from a homebrewed camera trap based on an Olympus VG-140.
The camera trap still photos in more recent posts were taken with homebrewed camera traps using either Sony S40s or Nikon L11s the photos from those cameras are of similar quality.

eileeninmd said...

Great video, the bear is my favorite. Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. I've been away and now catching up with my comments and blog visits. Have a happy day and week ahead.